Reading List

Please note that The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman is a required book for this course.

Week 1: Smartest or dumbest generation? 

Prensky, M. (2001a). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon. 9(5), 1-6.

Prensky, M. (2001b). Digital natives, digital immigrants, part II. Do they really think differently? On the Horizon, 9(6), 1-6.

Bauerlein, M. (2008). The dumbest generation: How the digital age stupefies young Americans and jeopardizes our future (pp.1-10). London, U.K.: Penguin.

Also, check out the website of the book and explore Media and Articles at http://www.dumbestgeneration.com/

Week 2: The history of computer, internet, and phone technology

Come to class having done your research on history of computer, internet, and phone technology.

Week 3: Web 2.0 technologies/Emerging forms of communication & community 

O’Reilly, T. (2007). What is web 2.0: Design patterns and business models for the next generation of software.

boyd, d. & Ellison, N. (2007). Social network sites: Definitions, history, and scholarship. Journal of Computer-mediated Communication, 13(1), 1. 

boyd, d. (2010). Streams of content, limited attention: the flow of information through social media. EDUCAUSE review, 45(5), 26. 

Silva, L., Goel, L., & Mousavidin, E. (2009). Exploring the dynamics of blog communities: the case of MetaFilter. Information Systems Journal, 19(1), 55-81.

Week 4: Cyberspace & Identity/ Cultural competencies in digital age 

Turkle, S. (1999). Cyberspace and identity. Contemporary Sociology, 28(6), 643-648.

Dibbell, J. (1993). A rape in cyberspace or how an evil clown, a Haitian trickster spirit, two wizard, and a cast of dozens turned a database into a society. Village Voice, 36-42.

Jenkins, H., Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robinson, A. J., & Weigel, M. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Chicago, IL: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Week 5: Unintended consequences of new technologies/Digital divide 

Leets, L. (2001). Response to internet hate sites: Is speech too free in cyberspace? Communication Law and Policy, 6(2), 287-317.

Hargittai, E. &Walejko, G. (2008). The participation divide: Content creation and sharing in the digital age. Information, Communication, &Society, 11(2), 239-256.

Week 6: Gender & computers/Genderizing human-computer interaction

Gersch, B. (1998). Gender at the crossroads: The Internet as cultural text. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 22(3), 306-321.

Cassell, J. (2002). Genderizing HCI. In The Handbook of Human-Computer Interaction (pp.402-411), J. Jacko & A. Sears (Eds.), Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Week 7: Race, identity, & technology/Race representation in video games 

Nakamura, L. (2008). Cyberrace. The Modern Language Association, 123(5), 1673-1682.

Wright, M. M. (2005). Finding a place in cyberspace: Black women, technology, and identity. Frontier, 26(1), 48-59.

Everett, A. &Watkins, S. C. (2007). The power of play: The portrayal and performance of race in video games. In The ecology of games: Connecting youth, games, and learning (pp.141-166), Katie Salen (Ed.). The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning, Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Leonard, D. (2003). Live in your world, play in ours. Race, video games, and consuming the other. Simile: Studies in Media & Information Literacy Education, 3(4), 1-9.

Week 8: Class, identity, and technology 

boyd, d. (2011). White flight in networked publics? How race and class shaped American teen engagement with MySpace and Facebook. In Race After the Internet (Eds. Lisa Nakamura & Peter A. Chow-White) (pp.203-222) Routledge.

Week 9: Class and technology engagement/Technology and elections 

Lee, L. (2008). The impact of young people’s internet use on class boundaries and life trajectories. Sociology, 42(1), 137-153.

Gueorguieva, V. (2008). Voters, MySpace, and Youtube: The impact of alternative communication channels on the 2006 election cycle and beyond. Social Science Computer Review, 26(3), 288-300.

Week 10: Technology and civic engagement/Technology and education

Rheingold, H. (2008). Using participatory media and public voice to encourage civic engagement. In Civic Life: Learning how digital media can engage youth (pp.97-118), W. Lance Bennett (Ed.). The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Halverson, R. & Smith, A. (2009). How new technologies have (and have not) changed teaching and learning in schools. Journal of Computing in Teacher Education, 26(2), 49-54.

Week 11: Overview of different views of human-computer interaction/The psychopathology of everyday things 

McCarthy, J. & Wright, P. (2004). Technology as experience (pp.1-22). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Norman, D. (2002/1988). The design of everyday things (pp.1-33). New York, NY: Basic Books.

Week 12: Knowledge in the world vs. knowledge in the head 

Norman, D. (2002/1988). The design of everyday things (pp.34-80). New York, NY: Basic Books.

Week 13: Affordances and constraints/User-centered design principles 

Norman, D. (2002/1988). The design of everyday things (pp.81-140). New York, NY: Basic Books

Norman, D. (2002/1988). The design of everyday things (pp.187-218). New York, NY: Basic Books

Week 14: Situated actions/Activity theory, situated action, and distributed cognition

Suchman, L. A. (1987). Plans and situated actions: The problem of human computer interaction. Cambridge University Press.

Nardi, B. A. (1996). Studying context: A comparison of activity theory, situated action models, and distributed cognition. In B. A. Nardi (Ed.), Context and consciousness: Activity theory and human-computer interaction. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Week 15: Technology as experience 

McCarthy, J. & Wright, P. (2004). Technology as experience (pp.105-129). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

McCarthy, J. & Wright, P. (2004). Technology as experience (pp.131-146). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

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